Speaker: Prof. Lee Wan Ki, Wendy (Department of Music)
Date: 29 Novebmer 2013 (Fri)
Time: 4:00pm
Venue: Arts and Humanities Hub, G24, Fung King Hey Building, CUHKK
Language: English
Abstract: The birth of a new composition culminates an extended period of constant self-struggle and decision-making in the creative process. Not only does one need to have the ability to organize musical ideas convincingly, very often one must also have considerable knowledge on other fields of study. Over the centuries, music has survived as a subject that relies heavily upon its interactions with other disciplines. Whether it is cultural studies, language, literature, mathematics, or religion, for example, it is almost impossible to conduct musical research without also investigating its impact on composers, and on the latter’s creative output. From the Gregorian chants of the eighth and ninth centuries, to the multimedia productions of the 21st century, composers are more aware now than ever of the value of interdisciplinary. Through a presentation on the speaker’s compositional processes of “Macromusophagy” and “Silent Blooms,” the talk discussed how artists and scientists can unite to create something that will not only inspire the work of each other, but will enhance the pedagogical approaches of the respective fields as well. The speaker’s goal is not to offer a one-size-fits-all strategy; rather, the speaker hoped to provide insights that will serve as a springboard of ideas for academic endeavors.

 

macromusophagy and silent blooms 1  macromusophagy and silent blooms 2

 

For the powerpoint presentation of the talk, please click here